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Our Mission

The impact of poor literacy is lifelong. A childhood spent in silence and anonymity as a result of critically underdeveloped reading and writing skills can cause irrevocable damage. Young people experiencing these difficulties often leave school early, drastically limiting their prospects and options for the future. Sadly, this often leads to detachment from, or a troubled relationship with, society. This is the harsh reality for many young people marginalised by their cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Unable to communicate their ideas, fears and needs effectively - and often unwilling to try, for fear of being immediately shut down - their voices remain unheard.

We want to see an Australia where all young people have the skills and confidence to tell their stories, and shape their future.

Our programs are delivered exclusively in schools and communities that have a Family Occupation and Education Index above 100, indicating significant socioeconomic disadvantage, and/or high populations of young people who are Indigenous or from non-English speaking backgrounds. These are the young people most likely to have poor literacy, and to leave school early, with significantly reduced life outcomes.

Find out more at storyfactory.org.au

 
Students from Fairfield High School celebrating the completion of Story Factory’s ‘Our Faces, Our Stories’ program.

Students from Fairfield High School celebrating the completion of Story Factory’s ‘Our Faces, Our Stories’ program.

 

Creative writing changes lives!

MEET MAKAYLA


Makayla*[...] has probably the lowest literacy in the class. She has poor spelling, misses words and cuts sentences in half, and most of her writing is illegible. But she loved writing. And sharing. And just being there with us in session. She was always excited to share her work, with a big smile on her face. She spent time editing her work and it was a great story about overcoming Bigfoot by being smart and brave instead of violent. And she wrote herself as the hero of the story. That’s a significant breakthrough to me.
— - Bilal Hafda, Storyteller-in-Chief - Parramatta

*name has been changed